A Visit to Hemswell Antique Centre

As you may have gathered, I like finding new places to visit in my search for vintage. So I was happy to follow a tip from a work colleague about an antique centre north of Lincoln.

Hemswell Antique Centre is housed on one of the many redundant air force bases left in Lincolnshire after the war. The military buildings have been repurposed into a series of antiques showrooms with a variety of sellers.

Astra Antiques

Astra Antiques

The stock varies from pure antique to vintage, with a side-order of more modern collectables. I spent most of my first visit in Astra Antiques, which took up most of the day.

Biscuit Tin

Biscuit Tin

There was plenty of kitchenalia to keep me happy. This biscuit tin was a bit too battered for me however.

Basketware Pram

Basketware Pram

A toy pram made from woven material, a bit like a Lloyd Loom chair, but I couldn’t find any label to confirm my suspicion that they made it.

Basket Pile

Basket Pile

There was a huge pile of baskets at the bottom of the stairs,

Pile of Baskets

Pile of Baskets

How would you choose which one to take home?

Sewing Baskets

Sewing Baskets

Lovely vintage sewing baskets.

Cake Plates

Cake Plates

A lovely collection of glass cake stands.

Astra8

,I’m used to seeing one or two items of Hornsea pottery but this is one of the biggest groups I’ve seen for a long time.

Vintage Packing Boxes

Vintage Packing Boxes

You might need a box to take your finds home with you – how about one of these?

Scales

Scales

Classic kitchen scales (although they do look as if they need recalibrating!)

Ice cream Box

Ice cream Box

I’ve not seen an ice cream box before.

Lights

Lights

I really liked the display of lights over the stairwell. I have one like the one in the centre at home, and I love it!

Enamelware

Enamelware

These enamel containers, for coffee, milk and lunch look to have come from France.

Kitchenware

Kitchenware

And finally, a full matching set of kitchen containers.

This was only one building, and I was shopped out by the time I left. I’ll be back to explore the other buildings in the near future. In the meantime, I’d recommend having a look round yourself.

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An Unusual Way to Get to the Beach

I’m on holiday on the North Yorkshire Coast this weekend, and of course no coastal holiday is complete without a trip to the beach. In Scarborough, I found the most unusual way to get to the beach I’ve ever seen!

Bottom Station of the Tram

Bottom Station of the Tram

The town centre is high above the beach, and when the town was in its heyday as an Edwardian holiday resort, some bright spark had the idea of saving people from the steep walk up and down to the beach by building a tram.

One Tram Car

One Tram Car

It’s called a tram, but it looks more like a funicular railway to me.

There are two carriages, one goes up and one down so the weights cancel each other out, overlapping halfway down the track.

Counter Balanced Cars

Counter Balanced Cars

The carriages are pretty basic inside, with wooden bench seats and hanging straps. It was also noisy and juddery, but must have seemed revolutionary to the Edwardians who used it:

Car interior

Car interior

But it certainly saved the effort of climbing the hill.

View to the beach from the top station

View to the beach from the top station

You can find more details at: http://www.transportheritage.com/find-heritage-locations.html?sobi2Task=sobi2Details&sobi2Id=831

 

 

Back to Newark

A little late in the posting, but I thought I’d share my trip to the August Antique Fair at Newark. As with my last trip to the fair, I was really lucky with the weather. It rained heavily on the previous day and I really felt for the outdoor stall holders who definitely suffered. But on the Friday I went, the sun came out again and it was a really pleasant day.

There were a lot of European stalls this time:

Threshing Sledge

This threshing sledge would have been pulled over the dried corn or wheat. The base is studded with stones to separate the wheat from the chaff.

Dutch Trucks

Dutch Trucks

This Dutch company had brought several truck loads of goods.

Rolling pins

Rolling pins

There were random mixtures of items all over the place.

Wicker Pram

Wicker Pram

I loved this wicker pram, I’m guessing that it dates from the 50s.

Bottles

Bottles

The wicker braiding on these bottles was beautiful.

Fairground Bikes

Fairground Bikes

These bikes were probably from a fairground ride.

There was quite a lot of industrial vintage on offer as well:

Lampshades

Lampshades

More lampshades

More lampshades

Piles and cages of metal industrial lampshades

Life Buoys

Life Buoys

Nautical items:

Fortunately, or perhaps unfortunately, as we are still living in a small rented flat, I only bought a few small items:

American Pie Plate

American Pie Plate

These plates would have been sold with the pie, and carried a deposit to ensure that they were returned to the manufacturers.

Paper Bag Cook Book

Paper Bag Cook Book

I was intrigued by this cook book dating from 1911, particularly as I’ve just discovered how simple it is to cook vegetables in a roasting bag. I thought that I might be able to use the same bags to try out the recipes in this book.

Recipes

Recipes

Written by a former Chef at the Reform Club, it has 132 pages of recipes from meat to sweets, so it will keep me out of mischief for a while.

Buckles

Buckles

And finally, I snapped up this lovely selection of vintage buckles. I’m not sure what I’ll use them for yet, but I’ll definitely do something.

A Day Out at Kelham Hall

On Sunday, I went to an Art Deco and later British Style fair at Kelham Hall. This was going to be a blog about the great vintage items I saw on sale there, but sadly photography was discouraged and I can’t wax lyrical without showing you the pictures. Instead, as Kelham Hall is such an amazing place, I thought I would share the place with you.

Kelham Hall

Kelham Hall

Kelham Hall as it stands today was built by a Victorian brewing magnate. The architect was Gilbert Scott, who was also responsible for the Albert Memorial and St Pancreas.

Kelham Hall, side view

Kelham Hall, side view

Apparently, the plans for the original building were even grander, but the money ran out before the towers could be built!

Inside, everything is either carved:

Carved Pillar

Carved Pillar

Painted:

Ceiling

Ceiling

Carved and painted:

Arches

Arches

Made of stained glass:

Dining Room Window

Dining Room Window

Or decorative brickwork!

Arched Walkway

Arched Walkway

In the early 1900s, the Hall was bought by a monastic order who added an extension in the prevailing Arts and Crafts style to serve as a seminary.

Arts & Crafts Extension

Arts & Crafts Extension

Love these benches – originally from the Great Western Railway.

GWR Benches

GWR Benches

Given that this area is served by the East Midlands Railway, I wonder how these got here?

At the moment, Kelham Hall is used as the local Council’s headquarters, but is used to host weddings and events such as the Deco Fair.

Check out their website if you’d like to find out more.

Exploring Close to Home

I’ve been so busy exploring the area around my new hometown I have neglected to look for the vintage opportunities closer to home.

Newark does well for antique shops – which may be something to do with the famous Antiques Fair I blogged about here – but it’s not so easy to find vintage. Anyway, as I didn’t want to stray too far from home in this gorgeous weather, I decided to stay close and explore what Newark had to offer.

Tucked around the back of a tattoo parlour, I found a decommissioned church which is now home to the Newark Antiques Centre. This varied centre rents a series of ‘booths’ to independent traders, guaranteeing a wide range of items over the two floors.

Here are a few of the vintage items I found:

Tin tubs

Tin tubs

A nice collection of galvanised tin washtubs.

 

Painted Sledge

Painted Sledge

 

Completely the wrong subject for our current baking hot weather, but I love the painted detail on this sledge. Because of the steering mechanism and the painting, I am guessing that this is probably from Austria.

Shelving Unit

Shelving Unit

 

I really liked this idea of a shelving unit made from vintage wooden boxes. Just the thing to display your vintage treasures – although maybe not these novelty corn cob vases!

Corn cob vases

Corn cob vases

 

I liked these enamel jugs – I could have a serious enamel habit if my purse was deep enough, and I thought that the set of drawers (made of cardboard covered with vintage wallpaper) were also cute.

 

Enamel jugs

Enamel jugs

This lovely child’s rocking chair has seen a lot of use:

Childs rocking chair

Childs rocking chair

I like the contrast of the metal jelly mould on an old set of wooden steps.

Jelly mould

Jelly mould

It would be fair to say that although there wasn’t any dedicated vintage stands, there was enough vintage items spread across the stalls to make a vintage visit worthwhile. There is also an interesting looking café that I didn’t have time to explore, so now I have found it, I shall certainly be back to visit on a regular basis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newark Antique Fair

It has been an interesting few months in our household. As part of a job change, I’ve moved to Nottinghamshire and the ensuing upheaval has meant that my vintage exploits have been put on hold for a while.
But one of the joys of moving to a new area has meant a whole new set of vintage opportunities to explore and I look forward to sharing them with you.
This weekend was one of the best known and biggest fairs in Britain, the Newark International Antiques Fair.

This enormous fair takes place over two days at Newark County Showground. The first day is supposed to be the best, with an 8 o’clock start for the dealers and the really keen. Unfortunately I couldn’t make it until Friday which was the second day.
This was the warmest and sunniest day of the year so far, so I slathered on the Factor 50, slapped on a hat and made an early start.

The view of the fair from above (from the Fair's website)

The view of the fair from above (from the Fair’s website)

I quickly realised that there was no way I was going to be able to see everything. As well as stands in the showrings, there were smaller and pricier stalls in the indoor areas, rows of tents each with their own stand, and stalls set out in the livestock sheds.

Arcade of tented stands

Arcade of tented stands

But, as I like a challenge, I set off to cover as much ground as possible.There really did seem to be something for everyone, from interior design pieces and Art Deco, to vintage garden tools and European antiques. Here are a few things that caught my eye:

Unusual jointed male mannequin

Unusual jointed male mannequin

I’ve seen shop mannequins before, but never a male one that’s jointed, or quite so anatomically correct.

German Opera Hat Box

German Opera Hat Box

There were a lot of antiques from Europe, including this German opera hat box which was about an inch thick.

Hungarian enamel and zincware

Hungarian enamel and zincware

There were vans from eastern Europe, including an articulated lorry from Hungary that had brought over this load of bottles, enamelware and galvanised items.

Large Coloured Glass Jars

Large Coloured Glass Jars

Also from Eastern Europe, I loved these coloured glass jars. And only £25 each!

Vintage cart

Vintage cart

I’m not sure if this came from Eastern Europe, but it certainly looks as if it could have.

Vintage Dining Set

Vintage Dining Set

Imagine this in a retro kitchen!

Kitchen Cabinet

Kitchen Cabinet

Or if you prefer something a bit more vintage, this painted cabinet.

Candles in the Heat

Candles in the Heat

Did I say it was hot?! Look at what it did to these candles!

Enamel Ice Cream Sign

Enamel Ice Cream Sign

Such a shame there wasn’t an ice cream stand to go with this sign!

Enamel Advertising Signs

Enamel Advertising Signs

Plenty more enamel advertising signs.

I had expected to be able to wander round until the end of the fair, but many stallholders started packing up after lunch and the grounds rapidly emptied. That said, it was a great time to get bargains and I even saw stock left on the field after stallholders had left.

This is definately going to be a regular event on my calendar, but next time I’ll know that it is definately worth paying the extra to go on the first day of the fair.

A Busy Week

It’s been a busy week, with 5 auctions over 6 days. While I take a little time to sort through what I have bought, here’s a few things that caught my eye in the sale rooms:

This lovely cream enamel Belling cooker has a lovely vintage vibe.

Belling Cooker

Belling Cooker

And it goes beautifully with this vintage fridge

Fridge

Fridge

Still on the domestic front, I remember seeing hairdryers like this in hairdressing salons, but I never knew they came in a home version.

Hairdryer

Hairdryer

Or, if you fancy something a bit smaller/more modern (still in its original box).

Boxed Hairdryer

Boxed Hairdryer

I loved the shape of this unusual cheese dish, but couldn’t work out why it was so tall in comparison to its length – pretty, but not practical, unless you’re going to stack all your cheeses on top of each other!

Cheese Dish

Cheese Dish

I’m guessing that this glass dome was also used to cover food, but it was incredibly heavy, much too inconvenient  to protect cakes, so it may be for garden use?

Heavy Glass Dome

Heavy Glass Dome

I loved the way these seventies light shades were stacked, it made them look quite sculptural!

Lampshades

Lampshades

I loved this pair of pictures, just right for down here in Cornwall.

Seaside Girl

Seaside Girl

In fact, it may well have been modelled down here, the landscape (seascape?) definately has a Cornish feeling to it.

Seaside Boy

Seaside Boy

Apologies for the pictures by the way, I only had my camera phone with me.

Exploring Matlock

As those based in the UK will know, it’s a long way to get from my base in Cornwall to anywhere else in England. As a result, I am more likely to travel around the South West than further afield. However, I’m quite prepared to go further for a good reason and this year I ventured North for a family Christmas. On the way, I took the opportunity to stop at Matlock in Derbyshire, which is a lovely little town that I have often passed through but never fully explored.

Running parallel to the river, I found Dale Road, which is well worth a visit for visiting vintage fans.

View up Dale Road, Matlock

View up Dale Road, Matlock

These elegant shop facades date from Matlock’s days as an important Edwardian  Spa town.

The Old Picture Palace on this street is  home to Bamford’s Auctioneers http://www.bamfords-auctions.co.uk and may be familiar to viewers of Flog It! and Bargain Hunt which both film there on a regular basis.

Next up the street, I found ‘The Vintage Rooms’ , a mix of French and British vintage mixed in with modern, vintage sympathetic items.

Peering in through the windows it looked like a real treasure trove:

The Vintage Rooms, window display

The Vintage Rooms, window display

My apologies for the reflections, my camera couldn’t cope with the dusky light.

A Second Window

A Second Window

You can get a feeling for the glorious mix of items in the shop.

I picked out a few things that I quite fancied:

A French Wine Bottle Drier

A French Wine Bottle Drier

This rather gruesome bit of equipment was used for drying wine bottles. I liked the idea of using it to display Christmas decorations.

One of the back rooms had been set up as a vintage kitchen and I was agog at all the kitchenalia:

Cream Enamel Vintage Stove

Cream Enamel Vintage Stove

The floor tiles look like the original terracotta, and I remember my Grandma having an ironing board like the one next to the stove.

French Storage Jars

French Storage Jars

There were lots of vintage containers begging to go home with me:

Glass Storage Jar

Glass Storage Jar

Take your pick of rolling pins

A Bowlful of Rolling Pins

A Bowlful of Rolling Pins

Vintage kitchen cupboards. I love the cream and green combination, it reminds me of my Grandmother’s kitchen when I was a child.

Kitchen Cupboards

Kitchen Cupboards

Check out the blocks of ‘Fairy’ soap, and the old packet of Persil!

Also on a kitchen theme, this kitchen airer was used to display more vintage finds.

Kitchen Airer Display

Kitchen Airer Display

Next door, I found , but sadly wasn’t able to get in to investigate this intreaguing little shop.

ReWorks Windows

ReWorks Windows

Finally, I found my way to the Matlock Antiques and Collectables Centre.

Beautifully Decorated Christmas Window

Beautifully Decorated Christmas Window

I loved the display in this window, Christmassy, classy and using all the height of the magnificent curved Edwardian window.

This charming centre is home to over 50 stands from different sellers, so there really is something for everyone. I found vintage clothes, railwayania, furniture, jewellery and children’s toys. Here are a few things that caught my eye:

Child's Tambourine

Child’s Tambourine

I think this charming tambourine dates from the fifties.

And on a Christmas note, how about this to cook your Christmas pudding?

Pudding Steamer

Pudding Steamer

Still on a Christmas note, this unusual cover conceals a record telling the story of Christmas, with an accompanying book.

I thought the artwork was fantastic.

Christmas Record

Christmas Record

On the way out, my eye was caught by the display in a side window:

Kitchen Table WIndow Display

Kitchen Table Window Display

Check out the dough scrapers at bottom left, and the choppers halfway up the front of the table. You’d need serious smuscle to work in this kitchen!

Sadly, time and lack of daylight caught up with me at this point, so I had to call it a day and carry on with my journey. But I will definately be back for a repeat visit. There’s a cafe overlooking the river at the back of the Antiques Centre to check out, and I still haven’t made it into the town centre!

Vintage Car Envy

On one of the last sunny days we had in Falmouth – goodness, that seems a long time ago – I came across these beautiful cars parked up at the side of the road in the town centre.

Silver Karmann Ghia

Silver Karmann Ghia

White Karmann Ghia

White Karmann Ghia

 

Needless to say, I wasn’t the only one taking notice of these beauties.

Side view of white car

Side view of white car

 

These are VW Karmann Ghias convertibles, made in Germany sometime between 1957 and 1970.

Rear view of this German beauty

Rear view of this German beauty

 

These examples were in beautiful condition

Gleaming in the sun

Gleaming in the sun

 

Look at the beautiful red leather upholstery, trimmed with white piping.

Interior of the white car - check out the upholstery!

Interior of the white car – check out the upholstery!

 

The Karmann Ghia won awards for its design, and its clear to see why.

The cars were produced by the same VW  factory that made the VW Beetle after the war, and the early models used a Beetle chassis and engine.

In 1974, the Ghia was replaced by the VW Scirocco and the Porsche 914 – a sad day for fans of stylish cars.

Beautiful SIlver Car

Beautiful SIlver Car

These cars had German plates, so I assume they were here on holiday. I didn’t get to meet the drivers, but if I had I would have loved to have blagged a drive – purely in the interests of vintage research of course!!

Vintage in Redruth

Redruth is not the first place you think of visiting if you visit Cornwall. It was once a hub of the Cornish mining industry, and is full of faded grand Victorian buildings, but since the decline of the mines a hundred years ago, it has suffered from a loss of direction and a lack of investment. But in the five years I have been visiting, it has been re-inventing itself and the low rents mean that among the high street regulars you can find a number of vintage and other individual shops.

I went to visit Daisy Rain, a family run vintage business based in Redruth’s Old Steam Bakery, tucked between a florist and the Post Office on the main street:

Who would guess this is the entrance to a vintage emporium?

Who would guess this is the entrance to a vintage emporium?

Down the alleyway, is a complex of buildings that used to form the bakery, and now make up the shop, stores and workshop.

The family found the Old Steam Bakery over 20 years ago, and have kept the character of the building while building a thriving vintage business.

As you go in, you’re greeted by a treasure trove of vintage clothes, furniture and ornaments:

A rack of vintage hats:

A rack of hats, ready for next summer

A rack of hats, ready for next summer

This is the main room of the shop – chock full of goodies!

Everywhere you look, there's something of interest in this room!

Everywhere you look, there’s something of interest in this room!

I loved the way they’ve used parasols to cover the ceiling.

The old steam ovens can still be seen in the main part of the shop. These were heated by steam filled pipes – these and the fire places to stoke them are still in place (although you can’t see them):

One of the two steam ovens visible in the shop.

One of the two steam ovens visible in the shop.

These original (rickety) stairs lead to a second room, stuffed with vintage furniture and other goodies

Stairs to the First Floor

Stairs to the First Floor

Again, this is full of treasures

Upstairs at Daisy Rayne

Upstairs at Daisy Rain

I liked this unusual compote dish, I’ve seen plenty of cabbage leaf plates, but never one with grapes and vine leaves.

Grape Compote Dish

Grape Compote Dish

Downstairs they were preparing for Christmas, with vintage party clothes and heavy winter coats;

Racks and racks of vintage clothes, including Christmas party clothes

Racks and racks of vintage clothes, including Christmas party clothes

Lots of vintage christmas baubles:

A cabinet of Christmas decorations

A cabinet of Christmas decorations

More Christmas baubles

Even more Christmas Baubles

Even more Christmas Baubles

I love the baubles and had great fun spotting the ones we had on the family Christmas tree when I was growing up!

I left with two coats and the intention to return soon, and I’d recommend it as a place to visit if you’re in the area.